Getting a lo-fi sound using Phat FX in Logic Pro X: Step-by-step (Continued)

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr +

Following on from part 1, Mark Cousins shows us how to add some lo-fi treatments to drums and synth using Phat FX…

phat fx

7. Now add some Distortion to the drums. Because the drums now exist over a narrow frequency range, we’ve picked a heavy Scream setting at 100%. Try auditioning the effect with the band-pass before and after the Distortion block.

phat fx

8. Distortion adds harmonic material, so it’s often beneficial to tame some of that energy with a low-pass filter. 1000Hz (on a LP 12dB Rich setting) sounds suitably ‘dark’, but with all the added body of the Scream setting.

phat fx

9. Lo-fi drums wouldn’t be complete without a heavy dose of compression. As you can see, the Amount is pushed harder than the bass so that the drums start to pump and have an increased sense of body.

phat fx

10. The Envelope Follower is a natural fit with drums. We’ve set Filter Cutoff as the target, with the fastest attack setting and a release that is graduated enough to match the drum track (around 0.51s).

phat fx

11. The finesse of the effect is balancing the Depth of the effect (in the Envelope follower section) with the Filter Cutoff position. Note how the blue line indicates the modulation being applied additively to your initial setting

phat fx

12. One arguable omission from Phat FX is a delay module. To complete the lo-fi drum treatment, therefore, we’ll add some Tape Delay using the Ultra Dub setting. This is placed as insert effect after Phat FX.


The two principle forms of digital distortion

Downsampling and Bit Crush come to life when relative amounts are modulated using LFOs. Tempo-lock the LFO. Use either of the sample-and-hold waveforms for glitches or un-sync the LFOs and push their speed into audio-rate modulation.



phat fx

13. Now let’s look at the synth pad in Phat FX. To start, we’ve added a small amount of Soft Saturation and the Mod FX block. The Mod FX in its Soft setting produces Juno-like chorus that works with pad sounds.

phat fx

14. Now let’s add some side chain-styled amplitude modulation. On LFO 2, select the Ramp Up option from the drop-down menu, set the Rate to 1/4 notes (in sync mode) and the depth to around 50%.

phat fx

15. The pad should now pump up and down in the same way as if it were being side chained from a kick. The Depth of the LFO sets the amount of amplitude modulation, making it increasingly ‘pumpy’.

phat fx

16. With two LFOs to hand, there’s plenty of modulation possibilities with Phat FX. This next option uses a Sample-and-Hold waveshape, set to 1/16th and routed through to Filter Cutoff.

phat fx

17. In this application we’ve used a small amount of Depth on the LFO and positioned the Cutoff near the top-end of its range. The result is a subtle shimmer, rather than a pronounced stepping effect.

phat fx

18. This final option swaps out the Sample-and-Hold waveshape and instead uses a slow-moving sine wave on the LFO to slowly undulate the filter cutoff. As before, the finesse is in relative position of Depth and Cutoff.

For all the latest Logic tutorials head HERE




Share.

About Author

Mark Cousins

Mark specialises in sound design and cinematic productions. He's recorded with orchestras across Europe and is heavily involved in soundtrack composition.

Comments are closed.

SUMMER SALE! Try 3 issues for just £3 CLICK HERE